Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

PEDIATRIC

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?
In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday.

What should I use to clean my baby's teeth?
A toothbrush will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay. Any soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head, preferably one designed specifically for infants, should be used at least twice a day.

What is the difference between a pediatric dentist and a family dentist?
Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.

Are baby teeth really important to my child?
Primary, or "baby" teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.

Are thumb sucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child's teeth?
Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers when the permanent teeth arrive, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.

How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?
Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child's teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child's first birthday.

How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?
A check-up every six months is recommended in order to prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health.

Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?
Fluoridated toothpaste should be introduced when a child is 2-3 years of age. Prior to that, parents should clean the child's teeth with water and a soft-bristled toothbrush. When toothpaste is used after age 2-3, parents should supervise brushing and make sure the child uses no more than a pea-sized amount on the brush. Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing.

How do dental sealants work?
Sealants work by filling in the crevices on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.

How safe are dental x-rays?
There is very little risk in dental x-rays. Pediatric dentists are especially careful to limit the amount of radiation to which children are exposed. Lead aprons and high-speed film are used to ensure safety and minimize the amount of radiation.

How can parents help prevent tooth decay?
Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.

How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?
Have your pediatric dentist evaluate the fluoride level of your child's primary source of drinking water. If your child is not getting enough fluoride internally through water (especially if the fluoride level is deficient or if your child drinks bottled water without fluoride), then your pediatric dentist will evaluate your total fluoride intake, and make suggestions for your specific needs.

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ORTHODONTIC

What is Orthodontics?
Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that is officially known as Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. The purpose of orthodontics is to treat any type of malocclusion, which is simply another way of saying "bad bite."

When you have a malocclusion, that means your teeth, lips and/or jaws don't line up the way they should. As a result, your teeth may be crooked, your bite may not work correctly and your jaws may look unbalanced.

To fix bad bites, orthodontists - dentists who are specially trained - use braces and other corrective procedures, to achieve tooth and jaw alignment.

What is an Orthodontist?
An orthodontist is a specialist in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. All orthodontists are dentists, but only about six percent of dentists are orthodontists. Admission to orthodontic programs is extremely competitive and selective.

An orthodontist must complete college requirements before stating a three to five year graduate program at a dental school accredited by the American Dental Association (ADA). After dental school, at least two or three academic years of advanced specialty education in an ADA accredited orthodontic program are required to be an orthodontist.

What Causes Orthodontic Problems?
Most orthodontic problems are inherited. Examples of these genetic problems are crowding, spacing, protrusion, extra or missing teeth and some jaw growth problems.

Other malocclusions are acquired. In other words, they develop over time. They can be caused by thumb or finger sucking, mouth breathing, dental disease, abnormal swallowing, poor dental hygiene, the early or late loss of baby (primary) teeth, loss of permanent teeth, accidents, poor nutrition, or some medical problems.

Whatever the cause, an orthodontist is usually able to treat most conditions successfully.

Why is Treatment so Important?
Crooked and crowded teeth are hard to clean and maintain. Such problems can contribute to tooth decay, gum disease and tooth loss. A bad bite can also cause abnormal wear of tooth surfaces, difficulty in chewing and/or speaking, excess stress on supporting bone and gum tissue, and possible jaw joint problems.

What is the psychological impact of orthodontic therapy?
The emotional side of an unattractive smile may lower your self-esteem. Treatment may reduce appearance-consciousness during the critical development years. Appearances can have an effect on popularity, social behaviors, self-expectation, personality style, and self-image.

Adult orthodontics may positively affect career patterns, social acceptance, and self-confidence.

Why Should All Children Get an Orthodontic Check-Up by Age 7?
Most orthodontic treatment begins between the ages of 9 and 14, however, by age 7, most children have a mix of adult and baby teeth. Orthodontists can spot subtle problems with jaw growth and emerging teeth while some baby teeth are still present. That's important, because some orthodontic problems are easier to correct if they're found early.

Is an adult ever too old for braces?
No. Orthodontic treatment can be successful at almost any age. In fact, about one in every five orthodontic patients today is over age 18. Adults who have healthy teeth, bones and gums respond well to orthodontic treatment. It is never too late to get a healthy, beautiful smile.

What are orthodontic records and why are they necessary?
Orthodontic records usually include x-rays, photographs of the teeth and face, and models of the teeth. The records provide a wealth of information that is not always revealed by a visual examination. This may include missing teeth, extra teeth, the condition and development of tooth roots, growth patterns of the jaw and face, symmetry, and a host of other factors. Complete records form the basis for a thorough and accurate diagnosis and a sound treatment plan.

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Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

Dermody Pediatric Dentist & Orthodontics  Port St. Lucie, FL

 

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